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Work: Quilts, Collage, and Small Works & Sashiko

The images of Susan Faeder's work shown in this gallery section represent a sampling, and date from 1991–2009. If you would like to see images of more current work, or receive information about pricing or availability of the work for exhibition, please contact Susan directly. All images copyright Susan Ball Faeder and cannot be used without permission.

Quilts

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What the Tide Brings 2
Size: 36” W x 19” H
Technique: Machine Pieced and Hand Quilted
Materials: Mostly vintage Japanese Cottons, some over-dyed; Embellished with Beads & Shells
Completed: 2005



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What the Tide Brings 1
Size: 19 1/2” W x 35 1/2 “ H
Technique: Machine Pieced, Hand Quilted, with Japanese Sashiko Embroidery
Materials: Vintage Japanese Cottons, some over-dyed; Embellished with Beads & Shells
Completed: 2005

What the Tide Brings 1&2 – In the fall of 2004, I spent a week at a friend’s house along the NJ shore. Each day I walked on the beach and collected shells, read books, and began to incorporate what I found/saw on the quilts. It became apparent on Day Two that (as in life) we don’t really know what any given day will provide, on the beach or otherwise. And if we walk without expectation and just use our eyes, something beautiful will likely fall into our path. What a total luxury it was to just make art everyday and not have to worry about earning a living! These two works are the transition pieces away from the grid an on to the risky business of collage.



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March’s Distant Mountain Haze
Size: 57.5 " H x 36" W
Techniques: Machine pieced and hand-quilted and embellished.
Materials: Both commercially produced cottons and some hand-printed by the artist.
Completed: 2002

This is an abstract landscape quilt from the “months of the year” series. Growing up in Williamsport, I remember seeing the Susquehanna River as an everyday part of life. This is a view from my mind’s eye: Looking across to the trees on the other side in the month of March, just before the buds opened, when everything still seems grey and it usually rained a lot. Upon closer look, there are all ALL colors waiting, just behind this branch or that ground cover.



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Fire in the Forest
Size: 50.5" H x 34.5" W
Technique: Machine pieced, hand quilted
Materials: Both commercially produced cottons and also fabrics printed by Susan
Completed: 1997

The starting point for this quilt was a small piece of fabric of hand-printed leaves on fabric. I selected a palette of fabrics that would stretch the red/green of those leaves to create a feeling of the woods in autumn. The hand-quilted lines suggest both wind and leaf forms (now separated from the tree). My long-time friend, Marian Wolbers, upon seeing this quilt, honored me with a Japanese haiku poem:
Crimson mountain-top
A single leaf drifts and hangs
Wind out of nowhere.



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Stone Garden Windmill 2
Size: 42" square
Technique: Machine Pieced and Hand-quilted
Materials: Commercially produced cottons that Susan designed and Japanese hand-stenciled yukata cotton
Completed: 1999

This quilt has the same name as one of the fabric lines that I designed for Balson Hercules Company in New York in the late 90’s, one of 4 collections for which I created 100’s of fabric under the title of “Japanesque.” A few more samples of my fabric designs can be seen in the back room of the gallery displayed over bamboo. This particular Windmill quilt is the second of 2; the fabric producers purchased the first one. It’s probably the most traditional quilt in the show; I used a plastic “windmill” template designed by Pat Yamin of “Come Quilt With Me.” Pat was my first quilting teacher.



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Kasuri Kimono
Size: 22"H x 15"W
Technique: Machine pieced, Hand quilted
Materials: Both Vintage Japanese Hand-dyed Cottons and commercial cotton
Completed: 1992

I made this work in 1992. It was the first time I actually looked closely at Japanese hand-woven, hand-dyed aizome (indigo) kimono fabric. I interviewed several pieces around the border to see how they reacted with one another. I later developed this small kimono into a pattern for the business.



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Star of Fortitude
Technique: Machine Pieced, Hand quilted, Embellished with beads
Materials: Commerical cottons, hand-dyed American cottons, Hand-stenciled japanese yukata cotton, and Thai silks
Completed: 1991

From a quilter’s perspective, the foundation of this work is simply a log cabin. More specifically, this particular log cabin is referred to as a Pineapple. Ignoring the traditional layout and color for the Pineapple version, I captured a star from space for just a moment. Careful of the jagged edges, I spliced the star down the center to see the layers… right in to the core. The fabrics are mostly hand-stenciled Japanese summer kimono cottons called “yukata.” The center is Thai silk. It is quilted by hand with water ripples. An early attempt at self-portrait—or at least a curiosity about what was inside me.

Collage

About the ARIGATO BORO BORO BYOBU Series: From raising the cotton to spinning the thread, and from dyeing the thread in an indigo “bath” to setting the looms and weaving the cloth—it took about one year just to create enough cloth (a 12 meter length) to make one kimono. A labor of love combined with necessity produced a treasured and functional object. When a garment wore out, it was taken apart carefully and made into something else such as bedding, therefore extending the life of the cloth. And when the bedding wore out, that was taken apart and pieces were salvaged and used to patch other tattered cloth. Even the tiniest remaining scrap of cloth remained precious and useful. The Japanese term Boro refers to the condition of being worthless, unwanted, or tattered. If a piece of cloth is “boro boro,” it is a (doubly) useless thing. Indeed, many people see this kind of cloth as rags—but the Buddha wore rags! The word Byobu translates from Japanese as “screen” and refers to the Japanese folded paper screens). Arigato means “thank you” in Japanese. So, in this series, I am attempting to pay homage to this magnificent and already time-honored cloth—and to give it one more round of “life” or purpose, to recognize the spirit of the poeple who made it. The bits of cloth are hand sewn directly on to a base of netted nylon screen, allowing them still space to breathe, and in some cases, to be transparent. They are flexible and can also be hung with 3D shape—or worn.

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Arigato: Boro Boro Byobu 8 – Journal
Size: 46”W x 9” H
Technique: Collage, Stitched by Hand
Materials: Vintage Japanese Cotton Remnants, Handmade Paper, Nylon Netting
Completed: 2008



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Arigato: Boro Boro Byobu 7 – Red/Black
Size: 42”W x 10”H
Technique: Collage, Stitched by Hand
Materials: Japanese Dyer’s Cotton Rag Ends, Nylon Netting
Completed: 2008
Can be hung vertically or horizontally.



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Arigato: Boro Boro Byobu 6 – Seafoam/Red
Size: 45”W x 12”W
Technique: Collage, Stitched by Hand
Materials: Japanese Dyer’s Cotton Rag Ends, Nylon Netting
Completed: 2008
Can be hung vertically or horizontally.



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Arigato: Boro Boro Byobu 5 – Skirt
Size: 47”W x 18”H
Technique: Collage, Stitched by Hand
Materials: Vintage Japanese Indigo Rags, Nylon Netting
Completed: 2005



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Arigato: Boro Boro Byobu 4 – Night
Size: 18 1/2”W x 46”H
Technique: Collage, Stitched by Hand
Materials: Japanese Vintage Cottons
Completed: 2005



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Arigato: Boro Boro Byobu 3 – Day
Size: 20”W x 45”H
Technique: Collage, Stitched by Hand
Materials: Vintage Japanese Cotton Indigo Rags, Nylon Netting
Completed: 2005



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Arigato: Boro Boro Byobu 2
Size: 14 1/2”W x 37”H
Technique: Collage, Stitched by Hand
Materials: Vintage Japanese Cotton Remnants, Nylon Netting
Completed: 2005



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Arigato: Boro Boro Byobu 1
Size: 14 1/2”W x 37”H
Technique: Collage, Stitched by Hand
Materials: Vintage Japanese Cotton Remnants, Nylon Netting
Completed: 2005

Small Works & Sashiko

About the ONE THING LEADS TO ANOTHER Series: There are two examples from my newest series, the title of which is rather tongue in cheek. “Of course!” you say, “How can it not be so?” In truth, I’ve only recently discovered that in art (and perhaps in life) one cannot usually jump from A to M…one has to walk the path in baby steps. One has to step off the curb before crossing the street…walk down the block before turning the corner. One stitch at a time. Maybe two max. The stitch technique I use here is known as Japanese Sashiko, a mending stitch used to sew together layers of cloth for fireman’s gear. Now it is merely a decorative stitch to create line and pattern. Always done in high contrast to show the stitcher’s focus, it’s not as easy as one might think—to make a line of even stitches. One has to sit quietly and breathe—not unlike Zazen.

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One Thing Leads to Another: Sashiko Clouds
Size 17.5”W x 44”H
Technique: Machine pieced border and black, otherwise whole cloth, Japanese sashiko stitching
Materials: Commercially produced cottons and vintage Japanese fabrics
Completed: 2009



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One Thing Leads to Another: Sashiko Tiles
Size 19”W x 41”H (without hanger)
Technique: Machine pieced hand-stitched Japanese sashiko
Materials: Japanese vintage dyed and woven cottons, sashiko thread, buttons
Completed: 2009

About the MEDITATION Series: This is a series of six small fiber collages with titles that are somewhat embarrassingly dead giveaways.

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Meditation: When We Were Three
Size: 24”W x 12”H x 1”D (stretched on frame)
Technique: Machine Sewn with Hand Appliqué & Japanese Sashiko Embroidery
Materials: Vintage Japanese Cottons and Linen
Completed: 2004



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Meditation: Is That a Portal—Or Just Another Brick Wall?
Size 11” square
Technique: Collage, Hand Appliqué
Materials: Cottons & Silks, Old & New, Beads & Ribbons
Completed: 2004



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Meditation: The House Falls Apart
Size 11” square
Technique: Collage, Hand Appliqué, Japanese Sashiko Stitching, and Embellishment
Materials: Japanese vintage indigo-dyed cotton remnants, cotton thread, beads
Completed: 2004



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Meditation: Log Cabin
Size 16” square
Technique: Machine pieced, Hand-Appliqué, Sashiko Stitching
Materials: Both vintage Japanese hand-dyed cottons and commercial cottons, cotton thread
Completed: 2004



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Meditation: An Unlikely Pair Fight the Odds
Size 12” square
Technique: Collage, Hand Appliqué, Stitched, Embellished
Materials: Both vintage Japanese hand-dyed cottons and commercial cottons, cotton thread, beads
Completed: 2004



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Meditation: Work With What You Have
Size 28”W x 12”H
Technique: Machine pieced, hand quilted, and sashiko stitching
Materials: Vintage Japanese cottons and linen cotton thread
Completed: 2004
SOLD